2015 UN Climate Change Convention

Signatories to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will converge in Paris in December
to negotiate a new climate change agreement.

The Copenhagen Climate Change Conference in 2009 placed climate change policy at the highest political level with over 100 world leaders in attendance, making it one of the largest gatherings ever of its kind. [1]

Now, 6 years after a legally binding treaty failed to be agreed upon in Copenhagen, the signatories to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change will converge in Paris in December to negotiate a new climate change agreement. [2]

Although Copenhagen proved disappointing on a number of levels, it remains a pivotal point in history from which we can measure some key progressions in technologies, science and politics.

Low-carbon technologies have become more appealing and better understood, with increased agreement amongst governments, economists and businesses that climate change will be a big economic problem if left unchecked.

Countries such as China and India are investing heavily in a low-carbon future, with advances in science making it possible to gauge more accurately how the risks of extreme events rise with climate change. This innovation allows governments to consider the costs and benefits to their own economies of a low carbon future. [3]

These developments give fresh hope for the 2015 UN Climate Change Conference.

UN Framework Convention logo

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